G.R. SANTOSH

Born 1929, in Srinagar, Kashmir

Self-Taught Craftsman, Painting, Weaving, Papier-Mache (1947-53)
Government of India, Cultural Scholarship (1954-56)
M. S. University, Baroda, Student of N. S. Bendre (1954-56)

As Santosh explored his spiritualism, he thought that the end all of life is happiness and that happiness based on material concepts and physical pleasures was useless and ephemeral. Santosh preferred to follow the thought behind the composition. The artist further explains, "The Universal mind (Brahman) manifests itself by its own will and when transformed in an artist's mind becomes self-creative. The individual mind of an artist has the potential to transform the visual concept into the materialized creative expression: a work of art". Santosh generally uses a square and a trident to emphasize his tantric or Shaivite symbol. Whatever Santosh paints, he does not think and form images; it comes to him naturally as he breathes unconsciously. Eventually, Santosh combined the male and female in a pure image of the human form, leaving out the face, hands, and feet.


Select Posthumous Shows


2007 From the Vault, Highlights from the Herwitz and Gallery Collection, Aicon Gallery, New York
2007 Delhi Art Gallery, New Delhi
2005 Unrealistically, ArtsIndia, New York
2005 Contours of Modernity - An Exhibition of Contemporary Indian Art, Founder's Hall of SOKA
University of America in Aliso Viejo, CA
2005 Manifestations III : Hundred Artists from the Delhi Art Gallery Collection, Delhi Art Gallery, New
Delhi

Select Solo Shows
1994 Dhoomimal Art Gallery, New Delhi
1991 Little Theatre Gallery, New Delhi
1989 Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai
1985 Dhoomimal Art Gallery, New Delhi
1982 Modern Indian Paintings, Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.,USA
Contemporary Indian Art, Festival of India, Royal Academy of Art, London
1979-80 Contemporary Indian Art, organized by National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA) at Japan
1978 Exhibition at South Korea
Triveni Kala Sangam organized by Gallery Chanakya, New Delhi

Select Group Exhibitions

1991 Little Theatre Gallery, New Delhi
1989 Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai
1982 Modern Indian Paintings, Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.,USA
Contemporary Indian Art, Festival of India, Royal Academy of Art, London
1979-80 Contemporary Indian Art, organized by National gallery of Modern Art at Japan
1978 South Korea
Triveni Kala Sangam organized by Gallery Chanakya, New Delhi
1970 Exhibition, Bistidari, New Delhi
1969 Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai
1967 Dhoomimal Art Gallery, New Delhi
1964 Revel Gallery, New York
1963,65 Gallery Mayer, New York, Kolkata, Kabul, Tel Aviv
1962,71 Kumar Gallery, New Delhi

Awards and Scholarships

1991 Kala Ratna Award, All India Fine Arts and Crafts Society (AIFACS), New Delhi
1985 Received Kalhana Award, The Kashmir Education and Science Society, New Delhi
1984 Artist of the Year, Sahitya Kala Parishad, New Delhi
1979 Sahitya Akademi Award for Besukh Ruh (his collection of poems)
1977 Awarded Padmashri, Government of India
1973 National Award, Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi
1964 National Award, Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi
1959 First Prize, Kalidasa Jayanti Exhibition
1957 National Award, Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi
1955-56 Governor of Bombay's Prize



KRISHNA REDDY

Krishna Reddy, taught by the esteemed Stanley Hayter of Atelier 17 in Paris, is one of the most celebrated contemporary printmakers today. Krishna Reddy was born in Nandanoor, Andhra Pradesh in 1925. He received a degree in Fine Arts from Kala Bhavan, Santiniketan in 1947 and then taught at Kalakshetra, Madras. In 1949, Reddy went abroad to study at the Slade School of Fine Arts in London. In 1951 he went to Paris where he studied engraving under S.W. Hayter and then sculpture under Osip Zadkine from 1952 to 1955. Reddy also studied sculpture under Marino Marini in Milan, Italy from 1956 to 1957.

Although his work began in sculpture, Reddy calls himself a printmaker. His prints have a noted sculptural quality through the use of complex color juxtapositions. Reddy creates subtle grid-like designs on his plates with intricate texturizations. Reddy's work, in particular his viscosity prints, have earned him acclaim not only as a master and innovator of simultaneous color printing from a single plate, but also as an artist with a philosophy and message. The complex colors that he introduces in prints are marked by a contemplative approach to the infinite mysteries of nature.

Krishna Reddy's life has been spotted with fascinating encounters and meetings that have led him to his present artistic vision. While living in Paris he met often with the surrealists and the abstract expressionists, including Brancusi, Giacommetti, Andre Masson, and Ossip Zadkine. Reddy currently lives in SoHo and is a Professor Emeritus of Art and Art Education at New York University.



SOHAN QADRI


Sohan Qadri was born in Punjab in 1932 and is currently based in Copenhagen, Denmark.

He is considered a modern Tantric painter whose work owes as much to Western experimentation as to Eastern tradition.

Through his synthesis of the spiritual values of Buddhism and the rigorous simplicity of Scandinavian aesthetics, Qadri creates spiritually powerful compositions. The minimalist purity of his art can transport a viewer beyond the realm of the thinking mid to the transcendental state of meditation. The conscious mind, which judges, analyzes, and plans, recedes into the background and all that matters is the spiritual and aesthetic beauty of the experience.

Color is the key element in Qadri's work. He suffuses the paper with pure colors and then submits it to chance, allowing the textures to emerge in their own rhythms as the paper dries. While the end result feels distinctly Indian, it brings to mind the art of American painter, Mark Rothko, known for his famous fields of color. The use of dye, which fades and seeps through the paper, creates an effect similar to that of an Indian fabric or handicraft.

Qadri often uses vibrant colors such as deep reds, peacock blues, and rich yellow, to create strong color energies that impress the viewer with the sheer power of their vibrant calm. Apart from bold hues, he also uses a lot of white and black to convey the key Buddhist idea of emptiness. Here emptiness does not have any negative connotations associated with nothingness, rather it illustrates the concept that all things have no inherent unchangeable essence and that they are just part of the ebb and flow of the universe. This idea is also depicted by the perforations he creates in his paintings that look like circles of emptiness.

Sohan Qadri has held over 40 one-man shows in important galleries in New Delhi, Bombay, London, Zurich, Vienna, Brussels, Munich, Basel, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, Los Angeles, and New York.